Fall 2020 Registration

**Tuition is due by the close of business, August 5th. A late fee of $50.00 applies thereafter.

Freshman Courses:

CLA 2030 Development of Civilization III. Mr. Jones. (6 credits) Tuesday and Thursday, 9:00-12:00 pm. 

This course is the third semester of a four-semester exploration of the events, ideas, and documents that have shaped our world-wide civilization from pre-history up to the present day. CLA 2010 will take up the period from the discovery of the New World to the establishment of the American Republic (1800). Writings from this period will be drawn from the Reformation and Counter-reformation, the Enlightenment, the emergence of modern science, the rediscovery of the classical civilizations
of Greece and Rome, and the shift from feudal arrangements to the modern nation-state.

ECON 2010 Political Economy I. Dr. Jensen. (3 credits) Wednesday, 9:00-12:00 pm. 

Political Economy, much more than just economics, is an interdisciplinary course which focuses on the interrelationships among individuals, the community, the nation, and even the world. In short, it is the study of human action in all levels of society. This first course combines basic principles of economics with the works of the great economic thinkers from the 1770s through the mid-1800s. It includes micro and macroeconomics discussed in their historical context. We will read Locke, Adam Smith, Bastiat, John Stuart Mill, as well as Marx, Engels, and more.

MR 2020 Logic and Ethics. Professor Knox. (3 Credits)  Monday, 9:00-12:00 pm.

A course on logic? In today’s world? Logic involves making the best possible deductions and inferences based on known factual inputs. Basically, the logical process connects the dots from A to B to C, etc. A decent portion of the course will involve logic games. These games are commonly used to evaluate a potential attorney’s suitability for the profession. Once the LSAT test is passed, however, any value in the logical process seems to be set aside (your professor is an attorney, so take this with a grain of salt). We will not only train in logic games but will dissect current and historical issues based on facts we research individually and as groups. Group interaction and debate will be heavily emphasized to identify logical fallacies and identify correct logical direction. 

ELA 1010 Thinking and Writing Mr. C. (3 credits) Wednesday, 1:00-4:00 pm.

This is the first course in a two-part series applying classical principles to modern society. It will feature close examination of the thinking of influential figures in world history, and explore the connection between their modes of written expression and that influence. A significant aspect of the class will be the cultivation of the great writing skills that are a critical aspect of relationships.

Sophomore Courses:

CLA 2030 Development of Civilization III. Mr. Jones. (6 credits) Tuesday and Thursday, 9:00-12:00 pm. 

This course is the third semester of a four-semester exploration of the events, ideas, and documents that have shaped our world-wide civilization from pre-history up to the present day. CLA 2010 will take up the period from the discovery of the New World to the establishment of the American Republic (1800). Writings from this period will be drawn from the Reformation and Counter-reformation, the Enlightenment, the emergence of modern science, the rediscovery of the classical civilizations
of Greece and Rome, and the shift from feudal arrangements to the modern nation-state.

ECON 2010 Political Economy I. Dr. Jensen. (3 credits) Wednesday, 9:00-12:00 pm. 

Political Economy, much more than just economics, is an interdisciplinary course which focuses on the interrelationships among individuals, the community, the nation, and even the world. In short, it is the study of human action in all levels of society. This first course combines basic principles of economics with the works of the great economic thinkers from the 1770s through the mid-1800s. It includes micro and macroeconomics discussed in their historical context. We will read Locke, Adam Smith, Bastiat, John Stuart Mill, as well as Marx, Engels, and more.

MR 2020 Logic and Ethics. Professor Knox. (3 Credits)  Monday, 9:00-12:00 pm.

A course on logic? In today’s world? Logic involves making the best possible deductions and inferences based on known factual inputs. Basically, the logical process connects the dots from A to B to C, etc. A decent portion of the course will involve logic games. These games are commonly used to evaluate a potential attorney’s suitability for the profession. Once the LSAT test is passed, however, any value in the logical process seems to be set aside (your professor is an attorney, so take this with a grain of salt). We will not only train in logic games but will dissect current and historical issues based on facts we research individually and as groups. Group interaction and debate will be heavily emphasized to identify logical fallacies and identify correct logical direction. 

LANG 2010 Latin I. Dr. Smurthwaite. (3 credits) Monday and Thursday, 1:00-2:30 pm. 

These courses are designed to prepare you to read authentic Latin texts with help.  We will be using Wheelock’s Latin, 7th edition, and the accompanying workbook. I will also be bringing in videos and other ancillary texts to aid your learning of Latin language and culture. I advise you to purchase a good Latin dictionary; however, there are also some very good online dictionaries that you can access from a smartphone. I use these online resources all the time. The Wheelock texts are available online from Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

*Register as a full-time student if you plan on taking the full course load OR register for individual courses.