Fall 2021 Registration

**Tuition is due by the close of business, August 6th. A late fee of $50.00 applies thereafter.
Registration form is at the bottom of the page.

Freshman Courses:

CLA 1010 Development of Civilization I (5 credits) Mr. Gordon Jones. Tuesday and Thursday, 9:00-12:00 pm

This course is the first of a four-semester exploration of the events, ideas, and documents that have shaped our worldwide civilization from prehistory up to the present day. CLA 1010 will survey this development up to approximately the Fall of Rome in 476 AD. Students will read and discuss original documents. Throughout the semester, students will analyze the issues of family, social class, political legitimacy, and beauty in light of the works read.

MR 1010 Defense against the Dark Arts (2 credits) Mr. Chris Jones. Tuesday, 1:15-3:15 pm

This is a classical logic course in which students will not only study argument and logical fallacies but also examine them in connection with real disputes, such as the historic debates between Lincoln and Douglas and Cicero’s Philippics. We will delve into the writings of Paine, Aristotle, Nibley, and dissect current uses of persuasive and forensic language.

Phil 1010 Outline of Philosophy (2 credits) Dr. Jennifer Jensen. Monday. 1:00-3:00 pm

This course will provide a survey of philosophy from the Pre-Socratics to the modern era. We will study writings expounding the different aspects of philosophy from ethics to epistemology, helping students build a contextual historical foundation for their philosophical studies.

CON 1010 Principles of American Founding I (3 credits) Dr. Jennifer Jensen. Wednesday, 9:00-12:00 pm

This course is an in-depth look at the founding and development of the American republic with an appreciation of the uniqueness of that founding. Students will begin a study of the Constitution using the method advocated by Thomas Jefferson, which includes a study of such authors as Locke and Sidney, not overlooking their classical antecedents.

ELA 1010 Thinking and Writing
(3 credits) Mr. Chris Jones. Wed, 1:15-4:15 pm

This is the first course in a two-part series applying classical principles to modern society. It will feature close examination of the thinking of influential figures in world history, and explore the connection between their modes of written expression and that influence. A significant aspect of the class will be the cultivation of the great writing skills that are a critical aspect of relationships.

Junior Courses:

CLA 3050 Development of Civilization V (6 credits) Mr. Brian Knox. Tues and Wed, 9:00-12:00 pm

Civilization deals with the social and cultural interactions of society.  This is a huge spectrum.  Where a class centered purely in history often deals only with facts of who, what, when, and how, it often overlooks the “why”.  This course will encompass a holistic approach of American culture’s (literature, poetry, music, theater, and other past-times) influence on historical events and vice versa.  Moreover, human nature (how human nature affects historical and cultural events) will be a topic interwoven in the discussion.  As much as possible, the principles of the scientific method will be employed to ensure that the class’s understanding is based in fact, and not supposition.  Make no doubt about it – this will be a fun and colorful class!

MR 3060 Moral Reasoning; A Conflict of Visions (3 credits) Dr. Jennifer Jensen. Monday, 9:00-12:00 pm

This course investigates the moral rationale and underpinnings of Libertarian, Conservative, and Progressive ideas through the writings of their representative thought leaders and defenders. This will give students the background needed to understand and communicate with those on all sides. By comparing both their obvious and subtle nuances, the implications for humanity are further explored.

LANG 3030 Latin III (3 credits) 
Dr. John Smurthwaite. Monday 1:00-2:30 pm and Thursday, 10:30-12:00 pm 

These courses are designed to prepare you to read authentic Latin texts with help.  We will be using Wheelock’s Latin, Seventh edition, and the accompanying workbook. I will also be bringing in videos and other ancillary texts to aid your learning of the Latin language and culture. I advise you to purchase a good Latin dictionary; however, there are also some very good online dictionaries that you can access from a smartphone. I use these online resources all the time. The Wheelock texts are available online from Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

MATH 3010 Mathematics I (3 credits) Mrs. Andrea Briggs. Wed and Thurs 1:00-2:30 pm

Our English word “mathematics” comes from the Greek noun, “ta mathemata,” which in turn is related to the verb “manthano,” meaning “I learn, I perceive, I understand, I know.” How do we come to know or understand? What is knowable? How do I learn? In this course students will explore many such questions as they read mathematical classics throughout the year, starting with Euclid in Section I, and focusing primarily on Newton in Section II. These great thinkers will help students to understand logic and reasoning, help them develop their ability for logical thought, and open the world of mathematical beauty. We will use additional tools besides the classics to build the ability to think mathematically and logically: students will read B. Oakley’s A Mind for Numbers to build learning strategies, participate in group mathematical projects to practice thinking skills, and study contemporary history books to gain a bird’s eye view of the history of mathematics and how it has affected our world and how we think.

Sophomore Courses:

CLA 1010 Development of Civilization I (5 credits) Mr. Gordon Jones. Tuesday and Thursday, 9:00-12:00 pm

This course is the first of a four-semester exploration of the events, ideas, and documents that have shaped our worldwide civilization from prehistory up to the present day. CLA 1010 will survey this development up to approximately the Fall of Rome in 476 AD. Students will read and discuss original documents. Throughout the semester, students will analyze the issues of family, social class, political legitimacy, and beauty in light of the works read.

MR 1010 Defense against the Dark Arts (2 credits) Mr. Chris Jones. Tuesday, 1:15-3:15 pm

This is a classical logic course in which students will not only study argument and logical fallacies but also examine them in connection with real disputes, such as the historic debates between Lincoln and Douglas and Cicero’s Philippics. We will delve into the writings of Paine, Aristotle, Nibley, and dissect current uses of persuasive and forensic language.

Phil 1010 Outline of Philosophy (2 credits) Dr. Jennifer Jensen. Monday, 1:00-3:00 pm

This course will provide a survey of philosophy from the Pre-Socratics to the modern era. We will study writings expounding the different aspects of philosophy from ethics to epistemology, helping students build a contextual historical foundation for their philosophical studies.

CON 1010 Principles of American Founding I (3 credits) Dr. Jennifer Jensen. Wednesday, 9:00-12:00 pm

This course is an in-depth look at the founding and development of the American republic with an appreciation of the uniqueness of that founding. Students will begin a study of the Constitution using the method advocated by Thomas Jefferson, which includes a study of such authors as Locke and Sidney, not overlooking their classical antecedents.

MATH 3010 Mathematics I (3 credits) Mrs. Andrea Briggs. Wed and Thurs 1:00-2:30 pm

Our English word “mathematics” comes from the Greek noun, “ta mathemata,” which in turn is related to the verb “manthano,” meaning “I learn, I perceive, I understand, I know.” How do we come to know or understand? What is knowable? How do I learn? In this course students will explore many such questions as they read mathematical classics throughout the year, starting with Euclid in Section I, and focusing primarily on Newton in Section II. These great thinkers will help students to understand logic and reasoning, help them develop their ability for logical thought, and open the world of mathematical beauty. We will use additional tools besides the classics to build the ability to think mathematically and logically: students will read B. Oakley’s A Mind for Numbers to build learning strategies, participate in group mathematical projects to practice thinking skills, and study contemporary history books to gain a bird’s eye view of the history of mathematics and how it has affected our world and how we think.

*Register as a full-time student if you plan on taking the full course load OR register for individual courses.