Spring 2021 Registration

**Tuition is due by the close of business, December 10th. A late fee of $50.00 applies thereafter.

Freshman Courses:

CLA 2040 Development of Civilization IV.
Mr. Jones. (6 credits) Tuesday and Thursday, 9:00-12:00 pm. 

The second semester will take us to the modern day, covering the invention of the modern world, industrialization, radical individualism, secularization, and the impact of ideology on human society. As before, students will continue to track and analyze the issues of family, social class, political legitimacy, and beauty in light of the works read.

ECON 2030 Political Economy II. Dr. Jensen. (3 credits) Wednesday, 9:00-12:00 pm. 

Political Economy, much more than just economics, is an interdisciplinary course which focuses on the interrelationships among individuals, the community, the nation, and even the world. In short, it is the study of human action in all levels of society. This second course is a continuation of our study of political economy through the split into factions still here today. We will read from the writings of economists such as Mises, Keynes, Rothbard, Friedman, Hayek, and Sowell as well as others whose writings continue to play a role in our economy today.

MR 2050 Utopia/Dystopia. Professor Knox. (3 Credits)  Monday, 9:00-12:00 pm.

Utopians have long professed to hold the keys to the “perfect” world.  Postmodern socialists and communists relied upon the writings of Plato, More, Bacon, and Campanella. Much of current popular science fiction such as The Hunger Games and Brave New World incorporates ideals stolen directly from the ancient utopian literature. Even among Judeo-Christian scripture lie accounts of utopian-like existence. Understanding utopian/dystopian literature is vital to distinguishing between wisdom and folly as championed by various players on the world stage. This class will involve an in-depth discovery of utopian/dystopian literature building on ancient and modern texts. 

ELA 1040 Thinking and Speaking. Mr. C. (3 credits) Wednesday, 1:00-4:00 pm.

This is the second course in a two-part series applying classical principles to the modern managerial society. As a follow-on to Writing and Thinking, this course will examine the thinking of influential figures in world history, and explore the connection between their modes of oral expression and that influence. A significant aspect of the class will be an emphasis on great speaking and will include discussing great historical speeches by Lincoln, Churchill, Demosthenes, Socrates, Washington, Cicero, Gandhi, and many others.

Sophomore Courses:

CLA 2040 Development of Civilization IV.
Mr. Jones. (6 credits) Tuesday and Thursday, 9:00-12:00 pm. 

The second semester will take us to the modern day, covering the invention of the modern world, industrialization, radical individualism, secularization, and the impact of ideology on human society. As before, students will continue to track and analyze the issues of family, social class, political legitimacy, and beauty in light of the works read.

ECON 2030 Political Economy II. Dr. Jensen. (3 credits) Wednesday, 9:00-12:00 pm. 

Political Economy, much more than just economics, is an interdisciplinary course which focuses on the interrelationships among individuals, the community, the nation, and even the world. In short, it is the study of human action in all levels of society. This second course is a continuation of our study of political economy through the split into factions still here today. We will read from the writings of economists such as Mises, Keynes, Rothbard, Friedman, Hayek, and Sowell as well as others whose writings continue to play a role in our economy today.

MR 2050 Utopia/Dystopia. Professor Knox. (3 Credits)  Monday, 9:00-12:00 pm.

Utopians have long professed to hold the keys to the “perfect” world.  Postmodern socialists and communists relied upon the writings of Plato, More, Bacon, and Campanella. Much of current popular science fiction such as The Hunger Games and Brave New World incorporates ideals stolen directly from the ancient utopian literature. Even among Judeo-Christian scripture lie accounts of utopian-like existence. Understanding utopian/dystopian literature is vital to distinguishing between wisdom and folly as championed by various players on the world stage. This class will involve an in-depth discovery of utopian/dystopian literature building on ancient and modern texts. 

LANG 2020 Latin II.
Dr. Smurthwaite. (3 credits) Monday and Thursday, 1:00-2:30 pm. 

These courses are designed to prepare you to read authentic Latin texts with help.  We will be using Wheelock’s Latin, 7th edition, and the accompanying workbook. I will also be bringing in videos and other ancillary texts to aid your learning of the Latin language and culture. I advise you to purchase a good Latin dictionary; however, there are also some very good online dictionaries that you can access from a smartphone. I use these online resources all the time. The Wheelock texts are available online from Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

*Register as a full-time student if you plan on taking the full course load OR register for individual courses.