Curriculum

“My work is to seek after truth.”   – Algernon Sidney

 

What are you looking for in a college education?

 

We offer:

  • High-quality, principle-based education at a reasonable cost.
  • A life-long appreciation for knowledge and faith.
  • An understanding and appreciation of wisdom and beauty that are common to the human experience.
  • An understanding of the unique founding of the United States and a chance to join that great conversation.
  • Preparation for further study and entrepreneurial pursuits.
  • A college degree required for today’s professional world, and the type of education and leadership skills needed to build tomorrow.
  • Education within a wholesome religious environment.

 

Mount Liberty College currently offers only one undergraduate degree, a BA in Classical Liberal Arts.

    

Students enroll in related companion seminars each semester. Each set of courses has been developed as a unit to work together and is taught as an interdisciplinary search for true foundational principles and an understanding of the world in which we live. These courses include the following subjects:

  • American History
  • Communications
  • Current Events
  • Ethics
  • Fine Arts
  • Government
  • Language
  • Literature
  • Logic
  • Math and Physics Classics
  • Political Economy
  • Philosophy
  • Religions of the World
  • Speaking
  • World History
  • Writing
 

 

Our first year at Mount Liberty College will only be open to a select group of incoming freshman. As such, we will only be offering our freshman courses:

 

Fall Semester:

Development of Civilization I (5 credits)

CLA 1010. This course is the first of a four-semester exploration of the events, ideas, and documents that have shaped our world-wide civilization from prehistory up to the present day. CLA 1010 will survey this development up to approximately the Fall of Rome in 476 AD. Students will read and discuss original documents. Throughout the semester, students will analyze the issues of family, social class, political legitimacy, and beauty in light of the works read.

 

Defense against the Dark Arts (2 credits)  

MR 1010. This is a classical logic course in which students will not only study argument and logical fallacies but also examine them in connection with real disputes, such as the historic debates between Lincoln and Douglas and Cicero’s Philippics. We will delve into the writings of Paine, Aristotle, Nibley, and dissect current uses of persuasive and forensic language.

 

Outline of Philosophy (2 credits)

Phil 1010. This course will provide a survey of philosophy from the Pre-Socratics to the modern era. We will study writings expounding the different aspects of philosophy from ethics to epistemology, helping students build a contextual historical foundation for their philosophical studies.

 

Principles of American Founding I (3 credits)

CON 1010.   This course is an in-depth look at the founding and development of the American republic with an appreciation of the uniqueness of that founding. Students will begin a study of the Constitution using the method advocated by Thomas Jefferson, which includes a study of such authors as Locke and Sidney, not overlooking their classical antecedents.

 

Thinking and Writing (3 credits)

ELA 1020. This is the first course in a two-part series applying classical principles to modern society. It will feature close examination of the thinking of influential figures in world history, and explore the connection between their modes of written expression and that influence. A significant aspect of the class will be the cultivation of the great writing skills that are a critical aspect of relationships.

 

Spring Semester:

Development of Civilization II (6 credits)

CLA 1020. In this second semester, the course will cover the period from the Fall of Rome to the discovery of the New World, looking at the medieval struggle between secular and religious authority, the beginnings of capitalism, and the geopolitical events resulting in the shift in the center of cultural gravity from East to West. Throughout the semester, students will continue to track and analyze the issues of family, social class, political legitimacy, and beauty in light of the works read.

 

Principles of American Founding II (3 credits)

CON 1020. A continuation of CON 1010, this course will explore the structure raised by Washington, Madison, Jay, Hamilton, and other Founders, including the Anti-Federalists and will also explore the principles from which they drew.

 

Thinking and Speaking (3 credits)  

ELA 1020. This is the second course in a two-part series applying classical principles to the modern managerial society. As a follow-on to Writing and Thinking, this course will examine the thinking of influential figures in world history, and explore the connection between their modes of oral expression and that influence. A significant aspect of the class will be an emphasis on great speaking and will include discussing great historical speeches by Lincoln, Churchill, Demosthenes, Socrates, Washington, Cicero, Gandhi, and many others.

 

Science or Science Fiction (3 credits) Research methods and ideas

SCI 1030. This class will focus on applying research methodology to real-world issues and how knowledge and understanding are gained and defined.  Topics will include the scientific method, reason, facts vs. feelings, empiricism vs. a priori reasoning, relativism, and universal truth vs. the idea of individual truth in postmodernism. Authors read will include selections from the writings of Descartes, Locke, Spinoza, Berkeley, Hume, Hugo, Karl Popper, Steven Pinker, Matt Ridley, (and perhaps a few more at the professor’s whim). 

 

 

Questions? We can answer them!

 

 

Apply for the upcoming school year. The deadline is Jan. 31, 2020.